Ode to Omelets by Amanda Angel

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An omelet seems like the simplest thing to post a recipe for. Well, it is, but it isn’t. I know plenty of people who have tried and tried, unsuccessfully, to make great omelets, always finding that something goes wrong. One thing that I love about them is that they feel special. An omelet is something I order at a trendy brunch spot or on vacation, being that for the most part I have never felt successful in making them. But I also love them because eggs are the perfect vehicle for whatever add-ins you like! We are fortunate enough to have neighbors who keep us supplied with their free range eggs, but there are also tons of local farms selling their eggs at farmers’ markets. The taste and nutritional difference between local, pastured or free-range eggs and conventional eggs really is impressive. Lots of people are still under the impression that eggs are bad for you or full of cholesterol, but nutritional science has now proven that eggs have numerous health benefits and that the cholesterol content of the yolk does not cause an increase in LDL, the bad cholesterol. “The egg really is the most wholly nutritious food that you can eat. It has almost every vitamin and mineral that you need,” says allternativeliving.com, on proclaiming the high-protein Brewer Diet for pregnancy.

[pe2-image src=”http://lh3.ggpht.com/-T2IUD1ott70/UjUdSw7uIVI/AAAAAAAAAOM/LPz455RwDIo/s144-c-o/eggdifference.jpg” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/104413851917705081151/Omelet#5923673093085995346″ caption=”Thanks, Dazi Acres for the pastured vs. conventional eggs comparison – Click to View” type=”image” alt=”eggdifference.jpg” pe2_img_align=”right” ]

Thus, eggs are a staple in our home. Here is a recipe of my husband, Justin’s, favorite omelet that I made him just this morning.

http://tennesseetable.com/recipes/spinach-mushroom-omelet/

It is great to change out any veggies and type of cheese you like. My personal fave is asparagus, tomato, and goat cheese, yum! Think of it as the delicious delivery of clean nutrients to your body and use whatever is the most seasonal from your local farmer.

[pe2-image src=”http://lh6.ggpht.com/-Uu9txoQS_xo/UjUduKMAsGI/AAAAAAAAAOg/0Ni4eHWGuIc/s144-c-o/HerEggs.jpg” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/104413851917705081151/Omelet#5923673563721674850″ caption=”I want to eat her cray-cray eggs – Click to View” type=”image” alt=”HerEggs.jpg” ]

Here are the tips that I have learned from trial and error, just for my husband who loves for me to make him eggs for breakfast: First, the type of pan you use is important. We’ve owned “nonstick” before, but I was never able to make omelets well until we bought the Orgreenic skillet. They sell them all over now, under different brands. Secondly, sauté the veggies first and set aside to use as a filling. Trying to incorporate them into the eggs always resulted in disaster for me. Next, a flexible rubber spatula is good for lifting and turning. Lastly, be patient. Don’t turn your stove eye any higher than medium. It may go slowly at first, but at least you won’t have a brown, crispy crust on your eggs.

Please comment and share your best tips for omelets and eggs. I would also love to hear what delicious combinations you like to use in your fluffy, folded eggy masterpiece.

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